Some Days are Diamonds

Some Days are Diamonds ! The night was hot with the north winds of Summer blowing from the inland deserts of Southern Australia but they had abated when the alarm clock kicked me out of bed an hour ago. There is a stillness to the morning with no movement to disturb the left over heat from yesterday. The moon has long gone and it’s dark as I plod down the beach ramp pulling my “My Sun” sea kayak on it trolley.  I can see a ribbon of white at the waters edge and know that the shorebreak will be manageable this morning, at least until the tide starts it’s race inwards.

Out of the darkness appears Steve who already has his kayak on the beach and is geared up and ready to go. I swear this guy doesn’t sleep. We quickly gear up and launch as the sky brightens with the first rays of sun still over the horizon. We are on our way on another “Diamond Day” and will see the sunrise from the water.

The sun peeks over the hills and burns away the wispy clouds of night and brings with it a light breeze that is just enough to ripple the clear water.

The “Diamond Moment” of Sunrise…photo Steve King

We wander our way along the coast, first visiting our favourite reef areas and then heading further along the coast, enjoying the views towards the southern cliff lines.

Changing colours in the cliffs as the sun rises

As predicted the wind has increased a little in the last hour and there is now a definite chop on the water as we head back home catching a few runners on the way. We easily negotiate our way through the dumping shorebreak and slide up on the beach, all smiles.

Another “Diamond Day” has begun and we have enjoyed it from a magnificent vantage point.

But sometimes that “Diamond Day” can lose it’s sparkle, leaving you with severe case of sandy bum.  The shorebreak can be savage at times and the sea kayak sometimes has a mind of it’s own.

You pick up a wave out the back which immediately doubles in size and peaks menacingly over your head. You throw yourself into a brace as it slams down with a deafening boom. Then it all goes all watery as you are spat out, rolled and rocketed towards the shore in knee deep sand filled water. Well at least you’re back on shore; upside down in a few inches of water maybe, but still you made it.

Hold your breath and brace…..photo Robyn Pope

The Shorebreak …photo Gavin Lodge

Autumn is here and that’s the perfect time for early morning paddles with a friend. March has calmer winds and you just add another layer of clothing before heading out and of course there’s never a shorebreak in Autumn. If you’re looking for an early morning paddle then Steve’s the man in Adelaide.

Hope to see you on the water.
Ian Pope (with thanks to Steve King for dragging me out of bed)

Mr CHOMPY

It’s a beautiful summers morning. The sun is warm on my back as I slowly glide along the rocky coastline. The water temperature has jumped up with the recent spate 40 C days and I’m following a small school of fish and have already run through them a couple of times and had quite a feed, so now I’m just sauntering along enjoying the sun and the crystal clear water.

There are a number of small fishing boats out on the usual grounds and I decide that later on, if I can be bothered, I will surface next to them and give them a fright. I just love the way they yell and scream when I appear and there is always the mad scramble for cameras. Lots of video being beamed live to Facebook although the language seems a little out there at times and I wonder if it get censored first.

Then I see him. Strolling along by himself in a flashy little kayak. Quite some distance offshore, probably going out further to avoid the stink from those outboard motors, he is all by himself and would be easy prey. They say they are “all white meat and not many small bones” but I’m reluctant to try one as you have to peel away that fibreglass kayak shell first and I’m already full from a good feed of fish.

Still it could be worth a pass just to give him a scare and send him scurrying back to shore. I quietly glide up behind him and check him out; an older male of the species judging by the white hair and wrinkles.

I don’t think he has seen me so maybe I pop up next to him

I slowly passed right by him just deep enough so that my dorsal could nearly hit his paddle. Yep he saw me as there was that scream of surprise they seem to all have. Are they really that surprised at seeing me saunter by ? It’s not like I’m somewhere unnatural. I’m not strolling along the Esplanade or something.

Hey, the old guy is scrambling to get his camera aimed so I plunge back down into the depths waiting for him to paddle madly to shore. Hmm..he’s still sitting there quietly scanning with his lens so maybe he thinks I’m a playful dolphin. I’ll make another pass just to see his face when he realises I’m not a dolphin nor playful.

I give my back a little rub on the kayak hull, and that does the trick, with camera dropped and him paddling flat out towards shore. Look at him go, I think he’s almost faster than the fishing boats. My job done for the day I slowly saunter southwards enjoying the sun on my back and contemplate whether I should drop in on a couple of surfers later, just for fun of course.

Have a nice day
Mr CHOMPY

 

Seascapes

The sky is light blue and the water is crystal clear. You can feel the heat of the sun warming the sand as the northerly wind brings the heat from the inland. It has just gone 7am and there are a few people walking their dogs on the beach before the heat begins to really sear the landscape. There is already a heat haze visible far out on the horizon telling us that it will probably hit 40 Celsius later.

We escape the land for a few hours exercise as we head the kayaks out into Gulf St Vincent, heading south along the coastline. It’s great to be away from the heat of the land and the hustle and bustle of the city which will soon be into full swing with the after Christmas shopping.

You don’t get much calmer than this

It’s good to be gliding along this familiar coastline, especially on a clear morning. The last months have been occupied with many other things. Bike riding to the northern tip of Australia, mountain biking and Fat-biking in the northern Flinders Ranges and travelling the coastline with friends, with a little kayaking squeezed in.

Seascapes are the things that bring me back to the ocean. That place where the land meets the sea in a quiet slurping of a gentle swell around the rocks or in a deafening roar as large waves pound the coast. I’m paddling a favourite piece of coastline not far from the city of Adelaide. It’s a place I have been many times and always find it interesting and calming.

Quiet waters and rock sculptures

Today is definitely a “quiet slurping” day and we are able to get in close along the cliffs to enjoy the movements of the currents.

Just the three of us

We glide along visiting the rocky outcrops where Steve is always found. It’s not really best practice to follow him as the Seaward Passat double is like driving a shopping trolley with wonky wheels when you get in amongst the rock gardens. Both of us were admiring the view and taking photos as we hit a submerged rock and slew sideways, nearly capsizing. How embarrassing would that have been? Note to self; at least one of us should have a paddle in their hands for support if needed. “Take nothing but photos and leave nothing but gelcoat” is the old saying; well this time we left a nice chunk of gelcoat on that rock meaning a minor repair job this week.

The water was so calm Steve even managed a classic “selfie”.

We often lose Steve amongst the rocks and Cormorants

We quietly glided along the line of cliffs admiring the underwater seascape as well as that above.

Clear water and weathered rocks

 

Towering cliffs along the way

Then we turn and head for home and make a bee line for the launch spot. Steve heading off to another Xmas get together and us checking in at a favourite coffee shop.

Have a great 2018 hopefully with lots of paddling. We certainly will. 🙂