Seascapes and Sculptures

I’ve always been fascinated by seascapes and visiting new areas has been a great part of my enjoyment of sea kayaking. The Great Australian Bight certainly gives plenty to appreciate and here is just a small taste.

Clear calm waters along the Bunda Cliffs

Clear calm waters along the Bunda Cliffs

Granite islands

Granite islands

Granite outcrops

Granite outcrops

Often the elements sculpt the landscape into interesting shapes. Murphy’s Haystacks look like old time haystacks and the nearby granite is sculpted into various wave shapes.

Murphy's haystacks

Murphy’s haystacks

Stone wave formations

Stone wave formations

Weathered Insulbergs of granite

Weathered Insulbergs of granite

Other places have ever changing natural sculptures.

Shaped by the wind

Shaped by the wind

And sometimes you come across man-made sculptures that seem to blend into the environment

Salmon Pole

Salmon Pole

"She" with Top Gallant and Flinders Island on horizon

“She” with Top Gallant and Flinders Island on horizon

Sea Lion

Sea Lion

Left behind at the beach

Left behind at the beach

Gone surfing

Gone surfing

Fish Heads

Fish Heads

The Four Heads

The Four Heads

And sometimes man leaves things to slowly blend into the landscape.

Old dray cart

Old dray cart

Harvesters from the past

Harvesters from the past

Not every old piece of equipment is in decay.  We met Wes Davies who organised a classic car run from Perth to Sydney via the scenic route. Wes was a sheep buyer in this area in his younger days and now as a publisher and classic car fanatic in New Zealand, he shows others the beauty of the area in a truly classic way. I’ve always thought that certain cars from the 1950’s and 60’s had sculptured lines and a beauty of their own.

Perth to Sydney Vintage Car Rally.

Perth to Sydney Vintage Car Rally.

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7 thoughts on “Seascapes and Sculptures

    • Hi. Glad you liked the photos and thanks for your comment.
      Murphys Haystacks are inselberg granite rock formations located on the Calca Peninsula which is part of the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia. Formed of Hiltaba granite they have weathered slower than the surrounding limestone base forming these strange shapes. The story goes that in the late 1800’s a coach traveller who was pushing the idea of farrowing the land for better crop yield saw the formation in the distance and remarked that the farmer must be using his methods to produce so much hay. As the rocks were on a property owned by a man called Murphy, the rocks became known as Murphys Haystacks.

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